Bob Horner Arizona State University  One of the most decorated players in Arizona State University history, Horner left an indelible mark on Sun Devil baseball during his three seasons in Tempe. A versatile fielder, Horner played shortstop, second base and third base during his career, earning All-WAC honors three times. Horner hit 56 career home runs, still a school record. He helped lead the Sun Devils to three consecutive College World Series appearances, including the 1977 National Championship. He was named the Most Outstanding Player of the 1977 CWS, where he hit batted .444, hit two home runs and knocked in nine runs.

Bob Horner
Arizona State University

One of the most decorated players in Arizona State University history, Horner left an indelible mark on Sun Devil baseball during his three seasons in Tempe. A versatile fielder, Horner played shortstop, second base and third base during his career, earning All-WAC honors three times. Horner hit 56 career home runs, still a school record. He helped lead the Sun Devils to three consecutive College World Series appearances, including the 1977 National Championship. He was named the Most Outstanding Player of the 1977 CWS, where he hit batted .444, hit two home runs and knocked in nine runs.

Brooks Kieschnick University of Texas  Kieschnick was two-time ABCA Player of the Year, two-time Dick Howser Award-winner (1992-93) and Baseball America & Collegiate Baseball National Player of the Year (1993), among his many honors. He helped to lead the Longhorns to two Southwest Conference titles (1991-92) and two College World Series appearances (1992-93) in his three seasons. He recorded 43 home runs, 116 extra-base hits and 67 doubles during his career, ranking him second all-time in those categories.

Brooks Kieschnick
University of Texas

Kieschnick was two-time ABCA Player of the Year, two-time Dick Howser Award-winner (1992-93) and Baseball America & Collegiate Baseball National Player of the Year (1993), among his many honors. He helped to lead the Longhorns to two Southwest Conference titles (1991-92) and two College World Series appearances (1992-93) in his three seasons. He recorded 43 home runs, 116 extra-base hits and 67 doubles during his career, ranking him second all-time in those categories.

Bobby Winkles Arizona State University  ASU's first varsity baseball coach, Winkles was 524-173 in 13 years and a three-time NCAA Coach of the Year. He won three national championships ('65, '67, '69) in four appearances over the span of five years. Winkles took the ASU program from scratch and built it into one of the premier powerhouses in all of college baseball. Winkles was named the 1965 and 1969 NCAA Coach of the Year and The Sporting News Coach of the Year in 1965, 1967 and 1969. He was also a trailblazer in another area, as he became one of the first college coaches to transition to Major League Baseball. After leaving ASU, he managed four years in the Majors with the California Angels and the Oakland Athletics.

Bobby Winkles
Arizona State University

ASU's first varsity baseball coach, Winkles was 524-173 in 13 years and a three-time NCAA Coach of the Year. He won three national championships ('65, '67, '69) in four appearances over the span of five years. Winkles took the ASU program from scratch and built it into one of the premier powerhouses in all of college baseball. Winkles was named the 1965 and 1969 NCAA Coach of the Year and The Sporting News Coach of the Year in 1965, 1967 and 1969. He was also a trailblazer in another area, as he became one of the first college coaches to transition to Major League Baseball. After leaving ASU, he managed four years in the Majors with the California Angels and the Oakland Athletics.

Cliff Gustafson University of Texas  Gustafason was one of the top five all-time winningest coaches in NCAA Division I baseball history with a career record of 1,427-373-2 (.792) at Texas. He Led the Longhorns to National Championships in 1975 and 1983, 22 Southwest Conference titles and an NCAA record 17 College World Series appearances. He was a two-time National Coach of the Year (1982 & 1983) who won numerous Southwest Conference Coach of the Year honors and received the James Keller Sportsmanship Award in 1998. He is a member of the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame, the Texas Sports Hall of Fame and the Longhorn Hall of Honor.

Cliff Gustafson
University of Texas

Gustafason was one of the top five all-time winningest coaches in NCAA Division I baseball history with a career record of 1,427-373-2 (.792) at Texas. He Led the Longhorns to National Championships in 1975 and 1983, 22 Southwest Conference titles and an NCAA record 17 College World Series appearances. He was a two-time National Coach of the Year (1982 & 1983) who won numerous Southwest Conference Coach of the Year honors and received the James Keller Sportsmanship Award in 1998. He is a member of the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame, the Texas Sports Hall of Fame and the Longhorn Hall of Honor.

Dave Winfield University of Minnesota  Winfield was a First-Team All-American in 1973 and was a two-time All-Big Ten in 1971 & 73. In his senior season, he was 9-1 with a 2.74 ERA and 109 strikeouts in 82.0 innings; He also batted .385 with eight home runs and 33 RBI in 130 at-bats that season. He was named Most Outstanding Player in the 1973 College World Series. In the CWS, he was 1-0 in , giving up 10 hits, three earned runs and striking out 29 batters in 17.1 innings of work. Winfield was also 7-for-15 with two RBI in the CWS. He played 22 seasons in the major league. He had the winning hit in the 1992 World Series with the Blue Jays over the Atlanta Braves.

Dave Winfield
University of Minnesota

Winfield was a First-Team All-American in 1973 and was a two-time All-Big Ten in 1971 & 73. In his senior season, he was 9-1 with a 2.74 ERA and 109 strikeouts in 82.0 innings; He also batted .385 with eight home runs and 33 RBI in 130 at-bats that season. He was named Most Outstanding Player in the 1973 College World Series. In the CWS, he was 1-0 in , giving up 10 hits, three earned runs and striking out 29 batters in 17.1 innings of work. Winfield was also 7-for-15 with two RBI in the CWS. He played 22 seasons in the major league. He had the winning hit in the 1992 World Series with the Blue Jays over the Atlanta Braves.

Rod Dedeaux  University of Southern California  Dedeaux coached the Trojans for 45 years before retiring in 1986 with a record of 1,332-571-11, the most wins in Division I history until Cliff Gustafson of Texas surpassed him in 1994. Dedeaux led his team to 10 College World Series titles, including five consecutive from 1970-74. His Trojans won 28 conference titles. Nearly 60 USC players under Dedeaux went on to big league careers, including Mark McGwire, Randy Johnson, Tom Seaver, Dave Kingman, Fred Lynn and Roy Smalley.

Rod Dedeaux

University of Southern California

Dedeaux coached the Trojans for 45 years before retiring in 1986 with a record of 1,332-571-11, the most wins in Division I history until Cliff Gustafson of Texas surpassed him in 1994. Dedeaux led his team to 10 College World Series titles, including five consecutive from 1970-74. His Trojans won 28 conference titles. Nearly 60 USC players under Dedeaux went on to big league careers, including Mark McGwire, Randy Johnson, Tom Seaver, Dave Kingman, Fred Lynn and Roy Smalley.

Ron Fraser  University of Miami  Fraser won just about every honor, including NCAA national titles in 1982 and 1985. He left the coaching ranks as second winningest all-time coach with a 1,271-438-9 (.747) record. His UM teams set an NCAA record with 20 consecutive playoff appearances. His career at Miami spanned more three decades, with 12 trips to the College World Series. A 26-time coach of the year, he is a member of five halls of fame. Ron Fraser's uniform No. 1 was retired on April 24, 1993. He was the first Team USA coach when baseball was a medal sport at the 1992 Summer Games. He was known as “The Wizard of College Baseball” for his marketing innovations, including a “Night with Ron Fraser,” a $5,000 gourmet dinner on the infield that included Alaskan king crab and pheasant under glass.

Ron Fraser

University of Miami

Fraser won just about every honor, including NCAA national titles in 1982 and 1985. He left the coaching ranks as second winningest all-time coach with a 1,271-438-9 (.747) record. His UM teams set an NCAA record with 20 consecutive playoff appearances. His career at Miami spanned more three decades, with 12 trips to the College World Series. A 26-time coach of the year, he is a member of five halls of fame. Ron Fraser's uniform No. 1 was retired on April 24, 1993. He was the first Team USA coach when baseball was a medal sport at the 1992 Summer Games. He was known as “The Wizard of College Baseball” for his marketing innovations, including a “Night with Ron Fraser,” a $5,000 gourmet dinner on the infield that included Alaskan king crab and pheasant under glass.

Robin Ventura  Oklahoma State University  Ventura finished third in Baseball America's "Player of the Century" poll for college baseball behind Bob Horner and another Oklahoma State Hall of Famer, Pete Incaviglia. Ventura still holds college baseball's hitting-streak record at 58 games while boasting a .428 career batting average. In December of 2001, Baseball America named him the best College Baseball Player of The Last Twenty Years in the magazine's 20th Anniversary celebration in Boston. Ventura retired in 2004 after 16 seasons in the major leagues.

Robin Ventura

Oklahoma State University

Ventura finished third in Baseball America's "Player of the Century" poll for college baseball behind Bob Horner and another Oklahoma State Hall of Famer, Pete Incaviglia. Ventura still holds college baseball's hitting-streak record at 58 games while boasting a .428 career batting average. In December of 2001, Baseball America named him the best College Baseball Player of The Last Twenty Years in the magazine's 20th Anniversary celebration in Boston. Ventura retired in 2004 after 16 seasons in the major leagues.

Skip Bertman  Bertman guided LSU to five NCAA baseball titles (1991, '93, '96, '97, 2000), seven SEC championships and a record of 870-330-3 (.724) in 18 seasons, from 1984-2001. He was named National Coach of the Year six times, and his teams drew huge crowds to venerable Alex Box Stadium, as LSU led the nation in attendance in each of his final six seasons (1996-2001).  Bertman also served as head coach of the 1996 U.S. Olympic team that captured the bronze medal in Atlanta. He was inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame in January 2003. In a Baseball America poll released in January 1999, Bertman was voted the second greatest college baseball coach of the 20th century, trailing only Rod Dedeaux of Southern California.

Skip Bertman

Bertman guided LSU to five NCAA baseball titles (1991, '93, '96, '97, 2000), seven SEC championships and a record of 870-330-3 (.724) in 18 seasons, from 1984-2001. He was named National Coach of the Year six times, and his teams drew huge crowds to venerable Alex Box Stadium, as LSU led the nation in attendance in each of his final six seasons (1996-2001).

Bertman also served as head coach of the 1996 U.S. Olympic team that captured the bronze medal in Atlanta. He was inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame in January 2003. In a Baseball America poll released in January 1999, Bertman was voted the second greatest college baseball coach of the 20th century, trailing only Rod Dedeaux of Southern California.

Will Clark  Mississippi State University  Clark, a first baseman, was BCA All-American in 1984 and consensus All-American in 1985. In 1985, he became the first player in Southeastern Conference history to win the coveted Golden Spikes Award. He set am MSU career record with a .391 batting average, including 61 home runs, He was inducted into the MSU 2003 inductee into the MSU Sports Hall of Fame in 2003. Clark played 15 years in Major League Baseball, batting .303 and being named to the All-Star team six times.

Will Clark

Mississippi State University

Clark, a first baseman, was BCA All-American in 1984 and consensus All-American in 1985. In 1985, he became the first player in Southeastern Conference history to win the coveted Golden Spikes Award. He set am MSU career record with a .391 batting average, including 61 home runs, He was inducted into the MSU 2003 inductee into the MSU Sports Hall of Fame in 2003. Clark played 15 years in Major League Baseball, batting .303 and being named to the All-Star team six times.